Episode Three, Wherein the World’s Series is Played Entirely in Chicago

1906 WS Gm 5

Game 5 of the 1906 World Series at the West Side Grounds

The rules are codified to ensure a World Series is played every year. That means an annual city championship series in Chicago too. In 1906, the two ideas merge as the record-breaking Cubs and the “Hitless Wonder” White Sox meet in the first ever crosstown World Series.

Extra Notes

  • After the two leagues worked out an arrangement for the 1905 World Series, the fall classic was played every year until the strike-shortened season in 1994.
  • As of May, 2020, there have been 15 crosstown World Series since 1906; 14 in New York and one in St. Louis. The only other year in which both of Chicago’s teams made the playoffs was 2008, when they both lost in the first round.
  • Running totals through 1906 (including ’06 World Series):
    • Series – Tied 1-1-1
    • Games – Cubs 13-12

Sources and generally good reading*

Tinker to Evers to Chance: The Chicago Cubs and the Dawn of Modern America by David Rapp

Before the Curse: The Chicago Cubs’ Glory Years, 1870-1945 by Randy Roberts and Carson Cunningham

When Chicago Ruled Baseball: The Cubs-White Sox World Series of 1906 by Bernard A. Weisberger

*Many books were used to research features of several episodes of this podcast. Each book will be listed only once.

Featured Songs

“Binks’ Waltz” by Scott Joplin
“Frog Legs Rag” by James Scott
“Coax Me Medley” by Edison Military Band
“Grand Old Rag” by George M. Cohan
“Marching Through Georgia” written by Henry Clay Work
“There’ll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight” by Dukes of Dixieland
“There’ll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight” by Louis Armstrong
“So Long, Mary” by George M. Cohan
“Auld Lang Syne” by Glenn Miller Orchestra

Photos

Unless otherwise noted, photos come courtesy of the Library of Congress

1906 WS Gm. 6

Fans crowd the field after the White Sox take the 1906 World Series in the sixth game

Comiskey and Johnson

Charles Comiskey and AL President Ban Johnson